Could you foster or just spread the word about the need for foster carers?

Image Credit: 
..Photo by Coventry City Council CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
12 December, 2017

 

Could you foster or just spread the word about the need for foster carers? What kind of people foster children? According to research undertaken for the Department for Education, the people who are most likely to consider fostering are those who volunteer, work in the voluntary sector and those who are involved in their local communities. People who care about their society. People just like you.
With more young people than ever coming into the care system, the majority due to abuse or neglect, the need for foster carers is even greater. There are currently around 700 children in care in Bristol and 240 Bristol City Council foster carers.  

There are still many myths surrounding fostering and who is eligible to foster. You might think that you are not allowed to foster because you are single, have a full time job, are over 40, a smoker or gay and have quickly ruled yourself out. But actually, you may be exactly the type of person for this role. Your ability to care for and nurture a child is what matters.
If you are interested in finding out more about fostering go to www.bristol.gov.uk/fostering  ,call 0117 3534200 or email for an information pack on fostering.adoption@bristol.gov.uk.
If you are not in a  position to foster yourself please like the  Facebook page and follow on Twitter to help spread the word.

Foster Carers from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities

More people from black and minority ethnic (BME) and mixed heritage backgrounds who would like to become foster carers and adopters are urged to contact Bristol City Council for more information. Bristol is a diverse city with a diverse population of children in care. As with all children who are fostered it is vital that they are placed with carers who best suit their needs.  Carers from a whole range of ethnicities are needed so the needs of children coming into care can be better met and they can be placed with the right family as quickly as possible.

More than a quarter of children waiting to be fostered or adopted in the UK are from BME backgrounds. However not enough prospective foster carers or adopters are coming forward to care for these children. As a result these children tend to wait longer for families.

The council believes it is important to provide a child with a loving and caring environment where their culture and heritage is respected and promoted. Bristol City Council values and promotes diversity and has a BME support group for approved foster carers.

They also have unaccompanied asylum seeking children, usually boys around the age of 14. They are looking for foster carers who share the same language and culture as the children and young people who arrive in Bristol seeking asylum to ease their transition into life in England.

Shaliyah aged 8 says she likes that her foster carer looks like her, “It makes me less different and I like that she can do my hair properly”.

Foster carers receive 24 hour support, seven days a week, a weekly allowance and free training. If you are interested in finding out more about fostering go to www.bristol.gov.uk/fostering  ,call on 0117 3534200 or email for an information pack on fostering.adoption@bristol.gov.uk.
If you are not in a  position to foster yourself please like the Facebook page and follow on Twitter to help spread the word.

 

Rate this content: 
No votes yet